New TV Show Smash is a Smash Hit for NBC

Stars of Smash Christian Borle and Debra Messing play the fictional producers of the Marilyn musical. In an effort to increase it's audience, NBC introduced the new show, drawing 11.4 billion viewers on opening night.

Stars of Smash Christian Borle and Debra Messing play the fictional producers of the Marilyn musical. In an effort to increase it's audience, NBC introduced the new show, drawing 11.4 billion viewers on opening night.

by Maddie Nicolaisen

 

NBC’s new series Smash premiered Monday, Feb. 7, 2012, drawing generally positive reactions from viewers. Created by Theresa Rebeck and executively produced by Steven Spielberg, the show follows the production of a musical about Marilyn Monroe, a contribution to the Marilyn trend. It focuses on two aspiring actresses auditioning for the part of Marilyn, Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee) and Ivy Lynn (Megan Hilty). Actors like McPhee, a previous American Idol contestant, Angelica Houston, and Debra Messing, who is making her big TV come-back from Will and Grace, catch audiences attention.

Miramonte students are very enthusiastic, “I think it’s a great show, and I needed something for my Monday nights” said sophomore Simone Britto. Many compare it to a grown-up Glee, however that is not necessarily a bad thing, “The singing and dancing is really good,” said junior Grace Barosky, “but I think the idea is a little unoriginal.” However in the place of the mainstream pop songs that Glee has, are great original songs created by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman.

With more adult themes and original songs, the show is more interesting and appeals to a wider range of ages. The choreography is fantastic and gives the allusion that you are actually seeing a broadway musical. The characters are very enjoyable and Nick Jonas was on the last episode, and who doesn’t love Nick Jonas?

In an effort to boost its ratings, NBC has been vigorously advertising for it’s new show. It has been reported that the pilot cost $7.5 million to produce.

The estimated cost for outside media on Smash has reached $25 million, spent on billboards or print ads. That price does not include the promotional mentions that appear on commercials, and messages on the bottom of the screen during other shows over the last month, which everyone who owns a television has seen.

NBC’s ratings have severely declined in the last five years, averaging 6.9 million viewers this season, which is fourth behind CBS, Fox and ABC. This number is down 32 percent from NBC’s average five years ago. Despite huge numbers of viewers for the pilot, the number has steadily declined. Although this may be true, the series is a fantastic showcase of the talent that’s seemingly scarce in television today.