Recent Earthquake Rocks Bay Area

After+the+earthquake%2C+workers+blocked+off+a+badly+damaged+building.

L. Sinco/MCT

After the earthquake, workers blocked off a badly damaged building.

Kaitlin Fenn, Sports Editor

On Sunday, Aug. 24, at 3:20 a.m. a 6.0 earthquake rocked Napa Valley and sent aftershocks throughout the Bay Area. The epicenter of the quake was calculated to have been around six miles southwest of Napa, according to ABC News. Sunday’s shocker is the biggest in Northern California since the 6.9 Loma Prieta 25 years ago, and left numerous homes and restaurants in need of major repair, roads buckled, and 120 people injured.

Miramonte Geology teacher Nikki Leboy said, “This latest magnitude 6.0 Napa earthquake helps to remind us that we live in earthquake country and seismic activity should not surprise us all that much. This is, after all one of the more seismically active regions in the world. We need to be aware of the reality that we live among many faults here in the Bay Area and that more earthquakes are likely. The US Geological survey concludes the overall probability of a magnitude 6.7 or greater earthquake in the Greater Bay Area is 63% in the next 30 years, so being prepared and informed is really quite important.”

The aftershock of the quake hit Orinda Sunday morning, waking up many sleeping Miramonte students. “The aftershock here totally startled me,” junior Sabrina Ionescu said. “I woke up to my room shaking. It was very frightening.”

According to KTVU News, over 80 aftershocks, though small, have hit Napa and could continue for two weeks.

“I think that if you live here in the Bay Area, you should have a good earthquake/disaster plan in place,” Leboy said. “Talk to your family to decide where you all would meet in the event of a damaging earthquake. Decide on a plan of who you would contact in the family, where you would meet, what responsibilities each member may have, and to prepare an earthquake kit with water, food,  first aid materials, medications and other provisions.”

The USGS http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/preparedness.php , Red Cross, and California Office of Emergency Services all have good resources and information on what sufficient kits and plans contain.