Cafeteria Food Is Falling Down in the Health Department

Chris Berg, Staff Writer

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The cafeteria food at Miramonte is mediocre at best, and overpriced. The reason it is so unappetizing is the government regulations that call for making the cafeteria food more healthier. However, it has had adverse effects, such as impacting performance in the classroom. In addition, it should not be the government’s job to dictate what kids do and do not eat.

First, let’s start with the taste, quality, and selection of Miramonte’s food. Four out of five days of the week, the food is not very appetizing. They have also had pretty much the same options all the way through my four years here. If that’s not enough, they are attempting to make everything healthier but the school’s idea of healthy is beyond questionable. They give us pizza on wheat bread.  If healthy is what the school is looking for, then offer a better selection of fresh fruits and vegetables (I personally love steamed broccoli, but I haven’t seen much of it). Don’t kill a pizza.

It’s not only the pizza; it’s other small things: wheat bread on sandwiches, not having condiments when you receive your meal, or the chips fully baked. Although some of the things we eat are unhealthy, it should be the students’ choice to make that decision. It is not fair to the people who can control their diet to have to suffer. Also, the food choices students make at school are not what lead to obesity; it is their choices outside of school. There are only two times during the school day when students can eat cafeteria food, but at home they can eat as much and as often as they want.

High school is all about teaching teenagers to make adult decisions so when we go out into the real world we can live without the depending on administrators for everything. And taking away food we like is not teaching us anything; it’s only adding to the bad habits because more students are likely to eat what they can’t get a school.Taking our foods away–or using wheat bread–is only sweeping our bad habits under the rug. Those bad habits will only pile up.

If the schools wants healthy food, then they should take the initiative to go 100 percent. Instead of slapping a piece of meat on wheat bread and calling it a healthy meal, offer us grilled chicken, or organically grown food (good for the environment too).  Instead of frying everything, maybe boiling it is a better alternative. Putting something on wheat bread does not differ from using white bread. Granted, wheat has less carbs, but that’s one small area in the food pyramid. There is so much more the school is neglecting that could offer us a proper meal, and it would help our performance in the classroom when students have had full and good meals.

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