Women’s Tennis Looks to Rebuild

Georgia Briskey

Natalie Condon, Staff Writers

Playing against Alhanbra on Sept. 20, Cece Andrews ‘15 sets up a perfect forehand for the winning point.

With the loss of 11 seniors and key players, Meg Andersen ‘13 and Hanne Andersen ‘12, the varsity women’s tennis team strives to recreate their former success in division 1 NCS competition.

With captain Tamar McCollom and the three other returning varsity members leading the team, the team’s record is 4-0 in league matches.

This year, the team has 15 new players, which is an enormous change from previous years where strong seniors anchored the team.

“The good part about having such a young team now is that in the future our team will be very experienced and better in the years to come,” said junior and newcomer Leah See. “We also have a very good coach and the new players look very promising.”

Although the team is very young, the incoming players have contributed to the team with their effort and dedication. Taylor James ‘15, and Jen Stanten ‘15, as well as Anjali Majumdar ’14 have really proven themselves in tough matches on the singles ladder.

The team lost to one of their biggest rivals Mission San Jose, but still has important matches yet to come such as Campolindo and Carondelet .

Wednesday Sept. 14 the team played Piedmont and lost 2-7. However, they also won their first DFAL match against Dublin on Sept. 15.
 Also, on Sept. 20, the team won 9-0 against Alhambra.

“Our team doesn’t exactly know how well we’re going to do in NCS but we hope to do well and if we keep training harder, hopefully we’ll exceed our expectations,” said junior Caitlin Powell.

The Mats also won their match against Las Lomas on Sept. 27 and are preparing for their match against Acalanes on Thursday.

The team is very enthusiastic yet realistic about the season. They understand that it is a building year with the new players and loss of seniors.

“The girls need to walk off the court knowing win or lose that they played to their full potential,” said Logan Ehringer ‘12.