Miramonte Evades the Worst of the Storm

Students+try+to+avoid+the+rain+during+heavy+storm+conditions.+

Students try to avoid the rain during heavy storm conditions.

The storm that shut down many northern California schools on Thursday turned out to be nothing more than heavy rain at Miramonte. Acalanes Union High School District was one of the few districts in the Bay Area that remained open. According to Sean McFeely, student member on the AUHSD Governing Board, Superintendent John Nickerson said the district remained open because the Lamorinda area was not expected to face the full impact of the storm. However, Miramonte did distribute sandbags and recently renovated the piping system to alleviate the impact of the heavy rain.

According to Principal Julie Parks, the administration closely monitored the weather and remained in contact with the district. In the case of extreme storm escalation, Parks said the school was “prepared to take emergency measures.”

While not as prevalent in Lamorinda, the storm did have a major impact in parts of the Bay Area. More than 21,000 PG&E customers lost power during the day. Nearly a dozen state parks, including Mt. Diablo, shut down. According to the Lamorinda Patch, over 200 flights out of the San Francisco International Airport were cancelled.

While the winds in Orinda never broke 30 mph, they surpassed 100 mph near Reno and Tahoe. One resident was even spotted surfing on Lake Tahoe, as the winds were powerful enough to create small waves.

Friday’s weather forecast is less severe than Thu

Students try to avoid the rain during heavy storm conditions.
Students try to avoid the rain during heavy storm conditions.

rsday’s, but there will continue to be rain and light wind. Most schools in the Bay Area will reopen Friday.